How to Craft the Perfect YouTube Recruitment Video TEST 14

Let's say you're a recruitment marketer trying to reach passive job candidates on various niche platforms across the web. You know that active job seekers make up only 20% of candidates. You know that in order to reach the other 80% (many of whom would gladly switch jobs for the right company) you have to go where they are, and you've endeavored to do so, roiling out a recruitment mar-keting campaign on the sites where your ideal candidate personas spend their time, with the hopes of familiarizing them with your employer brand and your EVP. One problem: how do you know if your campaign is working?

  • Feb 13
  • 2 min read

TEST 13

We sat down with Julien Codorniou, VP for Workplace by Facebook, to get a behind the scenes look into run-ning a startup inside of Facebook, how they're building a less disruptive communication platform, and how they're reinventing the B2B sales and marketing play-book. 

here’s no denying that in the last few years employer branding has become a much more central piece of the talent acquisition puzzle. Talk to any recruiter or recruitment marketer for more than a few minutes and employer branding is sure to come up—and with good reason. Employer brand can play a starring role in building your company’s reputation, and a good or bad reputation can actually save or cost you money in the hiring process. And this is after only a relatively short period of prominence for employer branding as a concept. What about five, ten, or twenty years from now, when employer branding has developed a long history of driving recruitment efforts? 

Integration into Recruiting and Applicant Experience

 

Right now, your employer brand is probably the brainchild of a marketing or HR executive, with a limited role in business functions outside the immediate purview of recruitment marketing. Over the next five to ten years, expect this to change dramatically. Soon, the entire recruitment process will be seen as a venue for manifesting your brand in dynamic ways. If, for instance, your company is positioning itself as a learning environment with the chance to work with smart, talented people, each step in your recruitment funnel should reflect that image. This might take the form of educational content and conference talks at the top of the funnel, and be bolstered by team lunches and collaborative exercises during the interview stages. This way, the unique employer value proposition (EVP) that you’ve been conveying to potential new recruits will be reinforced, and they’ll take your commitment to providing that EVP seriously.

 

By the same token, if your brand is all about innovation and creative thinking, your applicant experience could reflect that with unusual interview challenges and a fast moving process. But applicant experience isn’t the only area that will call for more integration with employer branding—on the contrary, everyone at your company from the newest hire to the CEO should be aware of your EVP and working to make sure that it’s reflected in every aspect of the company, even the ones that have little to do with recruitment. Why? Because the average candidate will do two hours of research into your company before applying, and during those two hours she is likely to encounter not just your recruitment marketing, but your traditional marketing and your Glassdoor reviews. If you’re prioritizing your employer brand across your organization, then all of these elements will demonstrate your core values in a way that encourages applicants to take a chance on your company.

  • Feb 13
  • 3 min read

TEST 12

We sat down with Julien Codorniou, VP for Workplace by Facebook, to get a behind the scenes look into run-ning a startup inside of Facebook, how they're building a less disruptive communication platform, and how they're reinventing the B2B sales and marketing play-book. 

here’s no denying that in the last few years employer branding has become a much more central piece of the talent acquisition puzzle. Talk to any recruiter or recruitment marketer for more than a few minutes and employer branding is sure to come up—and with good reason. Employer brand can play a starring role in building your company’s reputation, and a good or bad reputation can actually save or cost you money in the hiring process. And this is after only a relatively short period of prominence for employer branding as a concept. What about five, ten, or twenty years from now, when employer branding has developed a long history of driving recruitment efforts? 

Integration into Recruiting and Applicant Experience

 

Right now, your employer brand is probably the brainchild of a marketing or HR executive, with a limited role in business functions outside the immediate purview of recruitment marketing. Over the next five to ten years, expect this to change dramatically. Soon, the entire recruitment process will be seen as a venue for manifesting your brand in dynamic ways. If, for instance, your company is positioning itself as a learning environment with the chance to work with smart, talented people, each step in your recruitment funnel should reflect that image. This might take the form of educational content and conference talks at the top of the funnel, and be bolstered by team lunches and collaborative exercises during the interview stages. This way, the unique employer value proposition (EVP) that you’ve been conveying to potential new recruits will be reinforced, and they’ll take your commitment to providing that EVP seriously.

 

By the same token, if your brand is all about innovation and creative thinking, your applicant experience could reflect that with unusual interview challenges and a fast moving process. But applicant experience isn’t the only area that will call for more integration with employer branding—on the contrary, everyone at your company from the newest hire to the CEO should be aware of your EVP and working to make sure that it’s reflected in every aspect of the company, even the ones that have little to do with recruitment. Why? Because the average candidate will do two hours of research into your company before applying, and during those two hours she is likely to encounter not just your recruitment marketing, but your traditional marketing and your Glassdoor reviews. If you’re prioritizing your employer brand across your organization, then all of these elements will demonstrate your core values in a way that encourages applicants to take a chance on your company.

  • Feb 13
  • 3 min read

TEST 11

We sat down with Julien Codorniou, VP for Workplace by Facebook, to get a behind the scenes look into run-ning a startup inside of Facebook, how they're building a less disruptive communication platform, and how they're reinventing the B2B sales and marketing play-book. 

here’s no denying that in the last few years employer branding has become a much more central piece of the talent acquisition puzzle. Talk to any recruiter or recruitment marketer for more than a few minutes and employer branding is sure to come up—and with good reason. Employer brand can play a starring role in building your company’s reputation, and a good or bad reputation can actually save or cost you money in the hiring process. And this is after only a relatively short period of prominence for employer branding as a concept. What about five, ten, or twenty years from now, when employer branding has developed a long history of driving recruitment efforts? 

Integration into Recruiting and Applicant Experience

 

Right now, your employer brand is probably the brainchild of a marketing or HR executive, with a limited role in business functions outside the immediate purview of recruitment marketing. Over the next five to ten years, expect this to change dramatically. Soon, the entire recruitment process will be seen as a venue for manifesting your brand in dynamic ways. If, for instance, your company is positioning itself as a learning environment with the chance to work with smart, talented people, each step in your recruitment funnel should reflect that image. This might take the form of educational content and conference talks at the top of the funnel, and be bolstered by team lunches and collaborative exercises during the interview stages. This way, the unique employer value proposition (EVP) that you’ve been conveying to potential new recruits will be reinforced, and they’ll take your commitment to providing that EVP seriously.

 

By the same token, if your brand is all about innovation and creative thinking, your applicant experience could reflect that with unusual interview challenges and a fast moving process. But applicant experience isn’t the only area that will call for more integration with employer branding—on the contrary, everyone at your company from the newest hire to the CEO should be aware of your EVP and working to make sure that it’s reflected in every aspect of the company, even the ones that have little to do with recruitment. Why? Because the average candidate will do two hours of research into your company before applying, and during those two hours she is likely to encounter not just your recruitment marketing, but your traditional marketing and your Glassdoor reviews. If you’re prioritizing your employer brand across your organization, then all of these elements will demonstrate your core values in a way that encourages applicants to take a chance on your company.

  • Feb 13
  • 3 min read

TEST 10

We sat down with Julien Codorniou, VP for Workplace by Facebook, to get a behind the scenes look into run-ning a startup inside of Facebook, how they're building a less disruptive communication platform, and how they're reinventing the B2B sales and marketing play-book. 

here’s no denying that in the last few years employer branding has become a much more central piece of the talent acquisition puzzle. Talk to any recruiter or recruitment marketer for more than a few minutes and employer branding is sure to come up—and with good reason. Employer brand can play a starring role in building your company’s reputation, and a good or bad reputation can actually save or cost you money in the hiring process. And this is after only a relatively short period of prominence for employer branding as a concept. What about five, ten, or twenty years from now, when employer branding has developed a long history of driving recruitment efforts? 

Integration into Recruiting and Applicant Experience

 

Right now, your employer brand is probably the brainchild of a marketing or HR executive, with a limited role in business functions outside the immediate purview of recruitment marketing. Over the next five to ten years, expect this to change dramatically. Soon, the entire recruitment process will be seen as a venue for manifesting your brand in dynamic ways. If, for instance, your company is positioning itself as a learning environment with the chance to work with smart, talented people, each step in your recruitment funnel should reflect that image. This might take the form of educational content and conference talks at the top of the funnel, and be bolstered by team lunches and collaborative exercises during the interview stages. This way, the unique employer value proposition (EVP) that you’ve been conveying to potential new recruits will be reinforced, and they’ll take your commitment to providing that EVP seriously.

 

By the same token, if your brand is all about innovation and creative thinking, your applicant experience could reflect that with unusual interview challenges and a fast moving process. But applicant experience isn’t the only area that will call for more integration with employer branding—on the contrary, everyone at your company from the newest hire to the CEO should be aware of your EVP and working to make sure that it’s reflected in every aspect of the company, even the ones that have little to do with recruitment. Why? Because the average candidate will do two hours of research into your company before applying, and during those two hours she is likely to encounter not just your recruitment marketing, but your traditional marketing and your Glassdoor reviews. If you’re prioritizing your employer brand across your organization, then all of these elements will demonstrate your core values in a way that encourages applicants to take a chance on your company.

  • Feb 13
  • 3 min read

TEST 9

We sat down with Julien Codorniou, VP for Workplace by Facebook, to get a behind the scenes look into run-ning a startup inside of Facebook, how they're building a less disruptive communication platform, and how they're reinventing the B2B sales and marketing play-book. 

here’s no denying that in the last few years employer branding has become a much more central piece of the talent acquisition puzzle. Talk to any recruiter or recruitment marketer for more than a few minutes and employer branding is sure to come up—and with good reason. Employer brand can play a starring role in building your company’s reputation, and a good or bad reputation can actually save or cost you money in the hiring process. And this is after only a relatively short period of prominence for employer branding as a concept. What about five, ten, or twenty years from now, when employer branding has developed a long history of driving recruitment efforts? 

Integration into Recruiting and Applicant Experience

 

Right now, your employer brand is probably the brainchild of a marketing or HR executive, with a limited role in business functions outside the immediate purview of recruitment marketing. Over the next five to ten years, expect this to change dramatically. Soon, the entire recruitment process will be seen as a venue for manifesting your brand in dynamic ways. If, for instance, your company is positioning itself as a learning environment with the chance to work with smart, talented people, each step in your recruitment funnel should reflect that image. This might take the form of educational content and conference talks at the top of the funnel, and be bolstered by team lunches and collaborative exercises during the interview stages. This way, the unique employer value proposition (EVP) that you’ve been conveying to potential new recruits will be reinforced, and they’ll take your commitment to providing that EVP seriously.

 

By the same token, if your brand is all about innovation and creative thinking, your applicant experience could reflect that with unusual interview challenges and a fast moving process. But applicant experience isn’t the only area that will call for more integration with employer branding—on the contrary, everyone at your company from the newest hire to the CEO should be aware of your EVP and working to make sure that it’s reflected in every aspect of the company, even the ones that have little to do with recruitment. Why? Because the average candidate will do two hours of research into your company before applying, and during those two hours she is likely to encounter not just your recruitment marketing, but your traditional marketing and your Glassdoor reviews. If you’re prioritizing your employer brand across your organization, then all of these elements will demonstrate your core values in a way that encourages applicants to take a chance on your company.

  • Feb 13
  • 3 min read

TEST 8

We sat down with Julien Codorniou, VP for Workplace by Facebook, to get a behind the scenes look into run-ning a startup inside of Facebook, how they're building a less disruptive communication platform, and how they're reinventing the B2B sales and marketing play-book. 

here’s no denying that in the last few years employer branding has become a much more central piece of the talent acquisition puzzle. Talk to any recruiter or recruitment marketer for more than a few minutes and employer branding is sure to come up—and with good reason. Employer brand can play a starring role in building your company’s reputation, and a good or bad reputation can actually save or cost you money in the hiring process. And this is after only a relatively short period of prominence for employer branding as a concept. What about five, ten, or twenty years from now, when employer branding has developed a long history of driving recruitment efforts? 

Integration into Recruiting and Applicant Experience

 

Right now, your employer brand is probably the brainchild of a marketing or HR executive, with a limited role in business functions outside the immediate purview of recruitment marketing. Over the next five to ten years, expect this to change dramatically. Soon, the entire recruitment process will be seen as a venue for manifesting your brand in dynamic ways. If, for instance, your company is positioning itself as a learning environment with the chance to work with smart, talented people, each step in your recruitment funnel should reflect that image. This might take the form of educational content and conference talks at the top of the funnel, and be bolstered by team lunches and collaborative exercises during the interview stages. This way, the unique employer value proposition (EVP) that you’ve been conveying to potential new recruits will be reinforced, and they’ll take your commitment to providing that EVP seriously.

 

By the same token, if your brand is all about innovation and creative thinking, your applicant experience could reflect that with unusual interview challenges and a fast moving process. But applicant experience isn’t the only area that will call for more integration with employer branding—on the contrary, everyone at your company from the newest hire to the CEO should be aware of your EVP and working to make sure that it’s reflected in every aspect of the company, even the ones that have little to do with recruitment. Why? Because the average candidate will do two hours of research into your company before applying, and during those two hours she is likely to encounter not just your recruitment marketing, but your traditional marketing and your Glassdoor reviews. If you’re prioritizing your employer brand across your organization, then all of these elements will demonstrate your core values in a way that encourages applicants to take a chance on your company.

  • Feb 12
  • 3 min read

TEST 7

We sat down with Julien Codorniou, VP for Workplace by Facebook, to get a behind the scenes look into run-ning a startup inside of Facebook, how they're building a less disruptive communication platform, and how they're reinventing the B2B sales and marketing play-book. 

here’s no denying that in the last few years employer branding has become a much more central piece of the talent acquisition puzzle. Talk to any recruiter or recruitment marketer for more than a few minutes and employer branding is sure to come up—and with good reason. Employer brand can play a starring role in building your company’s reputation, and a good or bad reputation can actually save or cost you money in the hiring process. And this is after only a relatively short period of prominence for employer branding as a concept. What about five, ten, or twenty years from now, when employer branding has developed a long history of driving recruitment efforts? 

Integration into Recruiting and Applicant Experience

 

Right now, your employer brand is probably the brainchild of a marketing or HR executive, with a limited role in business functions outside the immediate purview of recruitment marketing. Over the next five to ten years, expect this to change dramatically. Soon, the entire recruitment process will be seen as a venue for manifesting your brand in dynamic ways. If, for instance, your company is positioning itself as a learning environment with the chance to work with smart, talented people, each step in your recruitment funnel should reflect that image. This might take the form of educational content and conference talks at the top of the funnel, and be bolstered by team lunches and collaborative exercises during the interview stages. This way, the unique employer value proposition (EVP) that you’ve been conveying to potential new recruits will be reinforced, and they’ll take your commitment to providing that EVP seriously.

 

By the same token, if your brand is all about innovation and creative thinking, your applicant experience could reflect that with unusual interview challenges and a fast moving process. But applicant experience isn’t the only area that will call for more integration with employer branding—on the contrary, everyone at your company from the newest hire to the CEO should be aware of your EVP and working to make sure that it’s reflected in every aspect of the company, even the ones that have little to do with recruitment. Why? Because the average candidate will do two hours of research into your company before applying, and during those two hours she is likely to encounter not just your recruitment marketing, but your traditional marketing and your Glassdoor reviews. If you’re prioritizing your employer brand across your organization, then all of these elements will demonstrate your core values in a way that encourages applicants to take a chance on your company.

  • Feb 12
  • 3 min read

TEST 6

We sat down with Julien Codorniou, VP for Workplace by Facebook, to get a behind the scenes look into run-ning a startup inside of Facebook, how they're building a less disruptive communication platform, and how they're reinventing the B2B sales and marketing play-book. 

here’s no denying that in the last few years employer branding has become a much more central piece of the talent acquisition puzzle. Talk to any recruiter or recruitment marketer for more than a few minutes and employer branding is sure to come up—and with good reason. Employer brand can play a starring role in building your company’s reputation, and a good or bad reputation can actually save or cost you money in the hiring process. And this is after only a relatively short period of prominence for employer branding as a concept. What about five, ten, or twenty years from now, when employer branding has developed a long history of driving recruitment efforts? 

Integration into Recruiting and Applicant Experience

 

Right now, your employer brand is probably the brainchild of a marketing or HR executive, with a limited role in business functions outside the immediate purview of recruitment marketing. Over the next five to ten years, expect this to change dramatically. Soon, the entire recruitment process will be seen as a venue for manifesting your brand in dynamic ways. If, for instance, your company is positioning itself as a learning environment with the chance to work with smart, talented people, each step in your recruitment funnel should reflect that image. This might take the form of educational content and conference talks at the top of the funnel, and be bolstered by team lunches and collaborative exercises during the interview stages. This way, the unique employer value proposition (EVP) that you’ve been conveying to potential new recruits will be reinforced, and they’ll take your commitment to providing that EVP seriously.

 

By the same token, if your brand is all about innovation and creative thinking, your applicant experience could reflect that with unusual interview challenges and a fast moving process. But applicant experience isn’t the only area that will call for more integration with employer branding—on the contrary, everyone at your company from the newest hire to the CEO should be aware of your EVP and working to make sure that it’s reflected in every aspect of the company, even the ones that have little to do with recruitment. Why? Because the average candidate will do two hours of research into your company before applying, and during those two hours she is likely to encounter not just your recruitment marketing, but your traditional marketing and your Glassdoor reviews. If you’re prioritizing your employer brand across your organization, then all of these elements will demonstrate your core values in a way that encourages applicants to take a chance on your company.

  • Feb 12
  • 3 min read

TEST 5

We sat down with Julien Codorniou, VP for Workplace by Facebook, to get a behind the scenes look into run-ning a startup inside of Facebook, how they're building a less disruptive communication platform, and how they're reinventing the B2B sales and marketing play-book. 

here’s no denying that in the last few years employer branding has become a much more central piece of the talent acquisition puzzle. Talk to any recruiter or recruitment marketer for more than a few minutes and employer branding is sure to come up—and with good reason. Employer brand can play a starring role in building your company’s reputation, and a good or bad reputation can actually save or cost you money in the hiring process. And this is after only a relatively short period of prominence for employer branding as a concept. What about five, ten, or twenty years from now, when employer branding has developed a long history of driving recruitment efforts? 

Integration into Recruiting and Applicant Experience

 

Right now, your employer brand is probably the brainchild of a marketing or HR executive, with a limited role in business functions outside the immediate purview of recruitment marketing. Over the next five to ten years, expect this to change dramatically. Soon, the entire recruitment process will be seen as a venue for manifesting your brand in dynamic ways. If, for instance, your company is positioning itself as a learning environment with the chance to work with smart, talented people, each step in your recruitment funnel should reflect that image. This might take the form of educational content and conference talks at the top of the funnel, and be bolstered by team lunches and collaborative exercises during the interview stages. This way, the unique employer value proposition (EVP) that you’ve been conveying to potential new recruits will be reinforced, and they’ll take your commitment to providing that EVP seriously.

 

By the same token, if your brand is all about innovation and creative thinking, your applicant experience could reflect that with unusual interview challenges and a fast moving process. But applicant experience isn’t the only area that will call for more integration with employer branding—on the contrary, everyone at your company from the newest hire to the CEO should be aware of your EVP and working to make sure that it’s reflected in every aspect of the company, even the ones that have little to do with recruitment. Why? Because the average candidate will do two hours of research into your company before applying, and during those two hours she is likely to encounter not just your recruitment marketing, but your traditional marketing and your Glassdoor reviews. If you’re prioritizing your employer brand across your organization, then all of these elements will demonstrate your core values in a way that encourages applicants to take a chance on your company.

  • Feb 12
  • 3 min read
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